Youth theater group to perform play at Conner Prairie on 5 dates

Staff Report
Young actors with Asante Children’s Theatre will stage five performances of a full-length play beginning July 27 at Conner Prairie.

“More Light: Douglass Returns” written by Indiana playwright Celeste Williams was inspired by the historic return to Indiana by prominent American abolitionist, writer and speaker Frederick Douglass. Continue reading

Experience area close-up: 1816 Lenape Indian Camp

Interpreter Mike Pace works with a young girl, teaching her how to throw an authentic tomahawk inside 1816 Lenape Indian Camp at Conner Prairie.

By Hannah Kiefer
Last but not least in our experience area close-up series, we visit 1816 Lenape Indian Camp, the earliest time period that our visitors get to explore when they visit Conner Prairie.

Lenape Indian Camp looks at the relationship between white settlers in Indiana in the early 19th century and the Lenape Indians, also known as the Delaware Indians. Because Indiana became a state in 1816, the camp invites visitors to explore changes that statehood presented to the inhabitants of the land at that time. The experience area opened in the mid-2000s. Continue reading

About 850 animal, plant species call Conner Prairie home

About 850 different species of amphibians, reptiles, fish, insects, plants and birds call Conner Prairie home.

By Hannah Kiefer
When visitors think of Conner Prairie, they may often think of the characters who reside in 1836 Prairietown or who entertain in our 1863 Civil War Journey and Lenape Indian Camp. But, there’s a much more wild set of residents on our grounds: The wildlife.

Conner Prairie has more than 1,100 acres of land and most of that is untouched, so there’s quite a bit of wild space. Couple that with the fact that Conner Prairie is surrounded by roads and suburban neighborhoods and much wildlife in the area finds refuge on our property. This can include everything from mammals and birds to amphibians and reptiles.

Our grounds provide a variety of different environments, thanks to the White River, forested areas and the prairie, just to name a few features. Continue reading

Experience area close-up: William Conner House

William Conner House at Conner Prairie was built in 1823. It has undergone several interior and exterior renovations to keep Conner’s history alive..

By Hannah Kiefer
Next up in our series on our outdoor experience areas, we’re taking a look at the area that gave Conner Prairie its name: William Conner House.

Prior to living in the structure, Conner and first wife Mekinges lived in a two-room cabin about a half-mile north of where William Conner House now stands. Mekinges was a Lenape Indian. When she moved west with her and Conner’s children in 1820 after the Treaty of St. Mary’s, Conner would marry second wife Elizabeth and she moved into the cabin with him.

Conner built his home in 1823. He was a wealthy man in the area thanks to his business in the fur trade. His house is one of central Indiana’s oldest brick homes. The bricks were fired in a kiln that previously existed on-site, in the field behind where Animal Encounters now stands. Continue reading

Interpreters, seamstresses create new dress for character by hand in 56 hours

Staff Report
To celebrate Mother’s Day, seven women teamed up to make an entire dress (center above) in a weekend, from start to finish. The project took about 56 hours and the dress was made for Conner Prairie’s Mrs. Campbell character, a resident of 1836 Prairietown.

The dress was sewn by hand on the museum’s grounds by seamstresses and interpreters Libby Anderson (from left), Jenny Sherrill, Rachel Poe, Trudy Timkovich, Mary Van Zanten and Chris Kincaid. Shiela Sims also helped create the dress.